Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Mountain Biking’

Yoga-based Stretching for the Pain in Your Neck

Monday, May 7th, 2012

It’s true that your glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves take a toll after big rides, especially those first big rides. But it comes down to the core when it comes down to post-riding pain and particullary back and neck. Here are a few exercises that  align the spine, encourage upper body flexibility and relieve pain in the back, neck and shoulder–and a few can be done right at your desk. Check out Bicycling Magazine easy upper body training in yoga fashion.

The Art of Shifting

Monday, April 30th, 2012

How much do you know about shifting? To make riding more fun and bike repair less frequent, check out these tips from seven-time Canadian national cross-country champion Andreas Hestler from Bicycling magazine for a better ride and a longer drivetrain life.

  • Is cross chaining the answer? Riding in a combo of the big chainring and big cog, or the small ring and small cog, is generally not a good idea. But Hestler says, it can at times offer the ideal gear and races set their bikes to handle it. However, it’s rough to shift into.
  • Think before you shift. Your eyeing that hill climb before you and it’s all about anticipation. Anticipate your next gear and when to accelerate. Shifting after terrain changes sets you back energy-wise and slows you down. Same goes for sand and water crossings—think before you get in gear.
  • Care for your chain. Changing the chain, Hestler says, keeps you from having to replace your cogs and rings as often. And be weary of wet-dry riding, chains weaken in these conditions. Check your chainring and cassette for burrs and nicks.
  • Go easy. Make shifting light, careful and timely to avoid breaking something. “If you love your bike it’ll love you—shift lightly and carefully,” says Hestler.

 

Just Call Us the Original

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Outside Magazine rated San Juan Hut Systems #1 for the traditionalist hut-to-hut mountain bike trips. We also garnered the esteemed title as “the original hut-to-hut bike trip.” And, well, it’s true.

What’s Ready to Ride Regionally?

Monday, April 9th, 2012

The best way to know what’s ready to ride is to just get out there and ride it. Snow can linger on north facing terrain and mud can last in the shadier zones, but hike-a-bike is just part of riding in spring in Southwest Colorado. And when it’s dry, fast single track is ready, you’re ready to ride it.

For single track conditions in Durango, check out Trails 2000. Currently, they’re reporting that both Animas Mountain and Dallas Mountain Park are good to go. Overend Mountain Park and Powerline are still a little snowy and muddy but in fair condition.

In Cortez, the word is the famous and fun Phil’s World is ready to ride, and at Boggy Draw and Bean Canyon in neighboring Dolores, fair conditions exist with areas of mud.

Here in Ridgway, the Rock Quarry (a.k.a. Angel Ridge, World Class, Mountain Lion Alley, etc.) is in good, dry condition with spots of mud.

Remember: It’s best to ride what’s ready as muddy and snowy single track makes rutted single track once ridden–and no one likes that.

Skiing on snow is much more fun than trying to bike it. Patience…