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Archive for the ‘Moab’ Category

Seven Days in the Saddle: The Reward? Moab

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Mesa Arch in Canyonlands

You’ve made the trek to the mountain biking mecca and a well-deserved stop following 215 miles in the saddle. Now what’s next…stay a night or two and explore Moab.

Moab never ceases to amaze with its geographic wonder spanning slick rock domes, bowls and fins to high mesas and the La Sal Mountains’ 13,000-foot peaks. The gorge of the Colorado River provides its own beauty and recreation. And, don’t forget Arches and Canyonlands national parks…spectacular.

Best site for lodging options: Check out discovermoab.com .

 

 

Get Back in the Saddle, Comfortably

Friday, April 20th, 2012

If you don’t ride year-round, you know the outcome of those first rides in the saddle as summer approaches. Ouch: lower back and glute pain, hamstring, hip flexors and quad aches. How do you lesson the strain in these first rides? There are some simple answers that require a stability ball, some floor space and, most importantly, your motivation.

Bicycling Magazine offers up some stellar advice and it starts at the core—your core.

Try this one: Lie with the middle of your back on the stability ball with knees bent 90 degrees and feet flat on floor. Place hands behind head (don’t pull on neck). Squeeze belly button toward the spine, lift upper back off the ball. With your shoulders off of the ball, make a circular motion with your torso while applying pressure with lower back to ball through motion. Clockwise 15 ovals, counterclockwise 15 ovals.  Works the transverse abdominus (inner abs), stabilizes lower back, glutes, hamstrings and hip flexors.

“Why It Works: Despite the straightforward motion of the bike, your body moves in three directions: forward as you head down the road, vertically as your legs pedal up and down, and laterally as your hips and upper body rock side to side,” writes Bicycling author Dimity McDowell.

Just Call Us the Original

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Outside Magazine rated San Juan Hut Systems #1 for the traditionalist hut-to-hut mountain bike trips. We also garnered the esteemed title as “the original hut-to-hut bike trip.” And, well, it’s true.

What’s Ready to Ride Regionally?

Monday, April 9th, 2012

The best way to know what’s ready to ride is to just get out there and ride it. Snow can linger on north facing terrain and mud can last in the shadier zones, but hike-a-bike is just part of riding in spring in Southwest Colorado. And when it’s dry, fast single track is ready, you’re ready to ride it.

For single track conditions in Durango, check out Trails 2000. Currently, they’re reporting that both Animas Mountain and Dallas Mountain Park are good to go. Overend Mountain Park and Powerline are still a little snowy and muddy but in fair condition.

In Cortez, the word is the famous and fun Phil’s World is ready to ride, and at Boggy Draw and Bean Canyon in neighboring Dolores, fair conditions exist with areas of mud.

Here in Ridgway, the Rock Quarry (a.k.a. Angel Ridge, World Class, Mountain Lion Alley, etc.) is in good, dry condition with spots of mud.

Remember: It’s best to ride what’s ready as muddy and snowy single track makes rutted single track once ridden–and no one likes that.

Skiing on snow is much more fun than trying to bike it. Patience…

What Do You Take, What Do You Leave Behind? We Asked, You Told

Monday, April 9th, 2012

All you Repeat Offenders with San Juan Huts mileage under your belt, we heard ya!

What is absolutely crucial for a rider to take on the 215 -mile Durango to Moab or Telluride to Moab hut to hut trip, and what can you ditch?

Responses ranged from the very wise and simple-a Gortex windblock shell jacket-to the celebratory-wine in a bag, anyone? One rider brought too much gear as is the tendency for some folks and ended up shipping some unnecessary belongings back home from the tiny Gateway Post Office. Other advice was as straightforward as bring a change of clothes to avoid the 24-hour lycra adornment. Smart.

Our favorite: A solar charger for your phone or camera (there is no electricity at the huts) so that you can take photos and send them to us!

Thanks everyone for your input! And be sure to keep checking in on our Facebook page!