Archive

Archive for the ‘Bike’ Category

FREE Raffle for 2 coveted Solo entries for the 25 Hours in Frog Hollow Race

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

As a proud new sponsor of 25 Hours in Frog Hollow Race, San Juan Hut Systems just got two Free Solo Entries to raffle off! These are no longer available for sale as they sold out within minutes!

The venue rests in the shadow of Gooseberry Mesa and Zion National Park just outside the town of Hurricane, Utah. The staging area is known as Frog Town, and it is the hub where all the excitement takes place. The race is on November 2-3rd and is the “Longest 1 Day Race.”

25 Hours in Frog Hollow Race Course Stats

Total Length: 12.8 miles Single Track: 5.7 miles Double Track: 7.1
Elevation low : 3570 ft Elevation high: 4300 ft
Estimated Average Course Speed: 1 hour 25 minutes
Number of Hours in a Day: 25 Hours of daylight: 12 .5 Hours of dark: 12.5
Ave High Temp: 77 degree Ave Low Temp: 44 degree

How to Register to win:
1. Email San Juan Hut Systems and include the following:  your name and phone number, preferred email contact information,  .
2. Like San Juan Hut Systems’ Facebook Page.
3. Sign up for San Juan Hut Systems’ News Letter (don’t worry we won’t spam you).

Raffle will be held on October 17!

Winners will be contacted by phone or email.

 

Yoga-based Stretching for the Pain in Your Neck

Monday, May 7th, 2012

It’s true that your glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves take a toll after big rides, especially those first big rides. But it comes down to the core when it comes down to post-riding pain and particullary back and neck. Here are a few exercises that  align the spine, encourage upper body flexibility and relieve pain in the back, neck and shoulder–and a few can be done right at your desk. Check out Bicycling Magazine easy upper body training in yoga fashion.

The Art of Shifting

Monday, April 30th, 2012

How much do you know about shifting? To make riding more fun and bike repair less frequent, check out these tips from seven-time Canadian national cross-country champion Andreas Hestler from Bicycling magazine for a better ride and a longer drivetrain life.

  • Is cross chaining the answer? Riding in a combo of the big chainring and big cog, or the small ring and small cog, is generally not a good idea. But Hestler says, it can at times offer the ideal gear and races set their bikes to handle it. However, it’s rough to shift into.
  • Think before you shift. Your eyeing that hill climb before you and it’s all about anticipation. Anticipate your next gear and when to accelerate. Shifting after terrain changes sets you back energy-wise and slows you down. Same goes for sand and water crossings—think before you get in gear.
  • Care for your chain. Changing the chain, Hestler says, keeps you from having to replace your cogs and rings as often. And be weary of wet-dry riding, chains weaken in these conditions. Check your chainring and cassette for burrs and nicks.
  • Go easy. Make shifting light, careful and timely to avoid breaking something. “If you love your bike it’ll love you—shift lightly and carefully,” says Hestler.

 

Seven Days in the Saddle: The Reward? Moab

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Mesa Arch in Canyonlands

You’ve made the trek to the mountain biking mecca and a well-deserved stop following 215 miles in the saddle. Now what’s next…stay a night or two and explore Moab.

Moab never ceases to amaze with its geographic wonder spanning slick rock domes, bowls and fins to high mesas and the La Sal Mountains’ 13,000-foot peaks. The gorge of the Colorado River provides its own beauty and recreation. And, don’t forget Arches and Canyonlands national parks…spectacular.

Best site for lodging options: Check out discovermoab.com .

 

 

Get Back in the Saddle, Comfortably

Friday, April 20th, 2012

If you don’t ride year-round, you know the outcome of those first rides in the saddle as summer approaches. Ouch: lower back and glute pain, hamstring, hip flexors and quad aches. How do you lesson the strain in these first rides? There are some simple answers that require a stability ball, some floor space and, most importantly, your motivation.

Bicycling Magazine offers up some stellar advice and it starts at the core—your core.

Try this one: Lie with the middle of your back on the stability ball with knees bent 90 degrees and feet flat on floor. Place hands behind head (don’t pull on neck). Squeeze belly button toward the spine, lift upper back off the ball. With your shoulders off of the ball, make a circular motion with your torso while applying pressure with lower back to ball through motion. Clockwise 15 ovals, counterclockwise 15 ovals.  Works the transverse abdominus (inner abs), stabilizes lower back, glutes, hamstrings and hip flexors.

“Why It Works: Despite the straightforward motion of the bike, your body moves in three directions: forward as you head down the road, vertically as your legs pedal up and down, and laterally as your hips and upper body rock side to side,” writes Bicycling author Dimity McDowell.

Just Call Us the Original

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Outside Magazine rated San Juan Hut Systems #1 for the traditionalist hut-to-hut mountain bike trips. We also garnered the esteemed title as “the original hut-to-hut bike trip.” And, well, it’s true.

What’s Ready to Ride Regionally?

Monday, April 9th, 2012

The best way to know what’s ready to ride is to just get out there and ride it. Snow can linger on north facing terrain and mud can last in the shadier zones, but hike-a-bike is just part of riding in spring in Southwest Colorado. And when it’s dry, fast single track is ready, you’re ready to ride it.

For single track conditions in Durango, check out Trails 2000. Currently, they’re reporting that both Animas Mountain and Dallas Mountain Park are good to go. Overend Mountain Park and Powerline are still a little snowy and muddy but in fair condition.

In Cortez, the word is the famous and fun Phil’s World is ready to ride, and at Boggy Draw and Bean Canyon in neighboring Dolores, fair conditions exist with areas of mud.

Here in Ridgway, the Rock Quarry (a.k.a. Angel Ridge, World Class, Mountain Lion Alley, etc.) is in good, dry condition with spots of mud.

Remember: It’s best to ride what’s ready as muddy and snowy single track makes rutted single track once ridden–and no one likes that.

Skiing on snow is much more fun than trying to bike it. Patience…

What Do You Take, What Do You Leave Behind? We Asked, You Told

Monday, April 9th, 2012

All you Repeat Offenders with San Juan Huts mileage under your belt, we heard ya!

What is absolutely crucial for a rider to take on the 215 -mile Durango to Moab or Telluride to Moab hut to hut trip, and what can you ditch?

Responses ranged from the very wise and simple-a Gortex windblock shell jacket-to the celebratory-wine in a bag, anyone? One rider brought too much gear as is the tendency for some folks and ended up shipping some unnecessary belongings back home from the tiny Gateway Post Office. Other advice was as straightforward as bring a change of clothes to avoid the 24-hour lycra adornment. Smart.

Our favorite: A solar charger for your phone or camera (there is no electricity at the huts) so that you can take photos and send them to us!

Thanks everyone for your input! And be sure to keep checking in on our Facebook page!

When Does Our Bike Season Begin? Ready to Ride?

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Riding to the Gateway Hut mid-summer

Here in Southwest Colorado in spring it’s flip-flop weather one day, Sorels the next. With iffy spring conditions, summer sounds real appealing and perhaps far off. But it’s time to book your bike trip. Do you know when the huts are available?

Both the Telluride and Durango to Moab routes open in June, but dates vary due to high elevation hut locations where snow can fall and linger past the summer solstice.

Telluride to Moab: June 2, 2012 

(High elevation huts include Last Dollar Hut at 11,000 feet and Spring Creek Hut at 9,100 feet)

Durango to Moab: June 15, 2012 

(High elevation huts include Bolam Pass Hut at 11,411 feet and Black Mesa Hut at 10,625 feet)

Remember, too, when booking your hut trip to keep in mind winter can make an early appearance, as early as late August. But late September is generally the time we warn riders most about potential snowfall. Be prepared!

Our summer season is short, but oh so sweet!